APLS - Sjögren's Syndrome
 
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Table of Contents (click to jump to sections)

What is Sjogren's Syndrome?
Is there any treatment?
What is the prognosis?
What research is being done?


What is Sjogren's Syndrome?
Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which immune cells attack and destroy the glands that produce tears and saliva. Sjogren's syndrome is also associated with rheumatic disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. The hallmark symptoms of the disorder are dry mouth and dry eyes. In addition, Sjogren's syndrome may cause skin, nose, and vaginal dryness, and may affect other organs of the body including the kidneys, blood vessels, lungs, liver, pancreas, and brain.

Is there any treatment?
There is no known cure for Sjogren's syndrome nor is there a specific treatment to restore gland secretion. Treatment is generally symptomatic and supportive. Moisture replacement therapies may ease the symptoms of dryness. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be used to treat musculoskeletal symptoms. For individuals with severe complications, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive drugs may be prescribed.

What is the prognosis?
Sjogren's can damage vital organs of the body with symptoms that may plateau, worsen, or go into remission. Some people may experience only the mild symptoms of dry eyes and mouth, while others go through cycles of good health followed by severe disease. Many patients are able to treat problems symptomatically. Others are forced to cope with blurred vision, constant eye discomfort, recurrent mouth infections, swollen parotid glands, hoarseness, and difficulty in swallowing and eating. Debilitating fatigue and joint pain can seriously impair quality of life.

What research is being done?
The goals of research on disorders such as Sjogren's syndrome focus on increasing knowledge and under-standing of the disorder, improving diagnostic techniques, and finding ways to treat, prevent, and cure the disorder.

 

Select this link to view a list of studies currently seeking patients.

 

 Organizations

 

National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)
P.O. Box 1968
(55 Kenosia Avenue)
Danbury, CT 06813-1968
orphan@rarediseases.org
http://www.rarediseases.org
Tel: 203-744-0100 Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673)
Fax: 203-798-2291

National Eye Institute (NEI)
National Institutes of Health
Bldg. 31, Rm. 6A32
Bethesda, MD 20892-2510
2020@b31.nei.nih.gov
http://www.nei.nih.gov
Tel: 301-496-5248 Professionals 800-869-2020

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
National Institutes of Health
Bldg. 31, Rm. 4C05
Bethesda, MD 20892-2350
NIAMSInfo@mail.nih.gov
http://www.nih.gov/niams
Tel: 301-496-8188 877-22-NIAMS (226-4267)

National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)
National Institutes of Health
Bldg. 45, Rm. 4AS19
Bethesda, MD 20892-6400
nidrinfo@od31.nidr.nih.gov
http://www.nidr.nih.gov
Tel: 301-496-4261

Sjogren's Syndrome Foundation
8120 Woodmont Ave.
Suite 530
Bethesda, MD 20814-1437
tms@sjogrens.org
http://www.sjogrens.org
Tel: 301-718-0300 800-4-SJOGREN (475-6473)
Fax: 301-718-0322

Expertise
1525 4th Avenue
Suite # 700
Seattle, WA 98101
info@expertise.com
http://expertise.com/
Tel: 1 (887)-769-7769

http://www.expertise.com/home-and-garden/home-remodeling-for-disability-and-special-needs

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